KMZ

From Camera-wiki.org
Jump to: navigation, search

The predecessor of Krasnogorski Mekhanicheskii Zavod (Красногорский механический завод) – Krasnogorsk Mechanical Works or KMZ – was founded as Krasnogorsk Optical Works in 1942 in Sverdlovsk in the Urals in anticipation of a German invasion of the Soviet Union.[1] It produced optical equipment for the Soviet army, but as of 1994 very few surviving items were known.[1] In 1944 the factory moved to Krasnogorsk, a western suburb of Moscow.[1]

In 1945 KMZ began manufacturing photographic lenses based on specifications obtained from the Carl Zeiss factory in Jena when it was captured by the Red Army. In 1946 the factory began making cameras, starting with the Moskva folding camera.[1] In 1948 it began assembling FED cameras[1] to offset slow production from the FED factory. A little later it produced cameras termed "FED–Zorki" by later collectors: cameras engraved both with the name FED and with the KMZ emblem.[1] By 1949 it made some design changes, and thus production of the Zorki began.[1] In 1952, KMZ created an SLR based on the Zorki, and thus the Zenit was born.[2]

During the following decades KMZ focused on the mass production of existing designs while also expanding into military optoelectronics and other military production. In 1993 it was privatized and became the Krasnogorsky Zavod, SA Zverev (Krasnogorsky Plant, JSC stock company). In 2005 KMZ closed its camera division but continued production of the Horizon panoramic cameras, which were based on military artillery optics. Recently KMZ has restarted selling Zenit cameras.

Contents

35mm cameras

SLR

Rangefinder

Compact

  • 510, 520, 610, 620

Panoramic

  • FT-2
  • Horizont
  • Horizon 202
  • Horizon 205 pc
  • Horizon S3pro
  • Panofot

Stereo

  • Astra

120 film cameras

folding

SLR

Screw-Out Lens

  • Yunkor (Юнкор)

Subminiature

Instant

Lenses

KMZ manufactured lenses under a bewildering variety of model names. Because of the way Soviet industry was organised, some of these lenses were also made by other factories at times.[3]

  • Altair
  • Amber
  • Beam
  • Carat
  • Centaur
  • Gelionar
  • Granite
  • Helios
  • Industar[2]
  • Jupiter[2]
  • Lanthanum
  • Leningrad
  • Maisons
  • Meteor
  • Mercury
  • Minitar
  • Mir (e.g. Mir-1)
  • Orchid
  • OF-28P (ОФ-28П) f2.8/28mm Panorama
  • Orion
  • Pentar
  • Rubin
  • Roussarie
  • Signal
  • Sputnik
  • Tahir
  • Tair
  • Telemar
  • Teletair
  • Telezenitar
  • Uran
  • Uranium
  • Variogoir
  • Variozenitar
  • Vega
  • Zenitar
  • ZM
  • Zodiac

Bibliography

  • Princelle, Jean-Loup. The Authentic Guide to Russian and Soviet Cameras. 2nd edition. Hove: Foto Books, 1995. 200 pages. ISBN 1874031630.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 HPR. Leica Copies. London: Classic Collection Publications, 1994. ISBN 1-874485-05-4. P.345.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 HPR. Leica Copies. London: Classic Collection Publications, 1994. ISBN 1-874485-05-4. P.346.
  3. See Alfred Klomp's Camera Pages.

Links

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
External
Toolbox