Gossen

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Gossen is a renowned light meter maker based in Nuremberg, Germany.

In 1919, Paul Friedrich Karl Gossen (1872–1942) and Otto Cohn founded the company Paul Gossen Co. K.-G., Fabrik elektrischer Messgeräte in Baiersdorff. Within a few years the company had moved to Erlangen, grown, seen Cohn leave and Rita Gossen join, gone into and emerged from administration, and had successfully sold ammeters and similar devices.[1]

The company's first photographic exposure meter, produced in 1933, was the Photolux. Between then and 1949, other models included the Blendux and Cimbrux for cine. In 1961 the Lunasix was the company's first meter aimed specifically at the professional market and started the long line of professional meters. The next major change was the 1983 all electronic microprocessor controlled Mastersix. In a few years the entire range became electronic.

Contents

Hand held meters


Gossen professional meters

From 1961 with the Lunasix a distinct range of professional meters was offered, and from the 1977 Profisix two professional ranges referred to by Gossen as "Multi" and "Profi". From 1990 once again a single professional range was offered.

The Lunasix was only capable of ambient light measurement, hence the dedicated flash meter Sixtron. From the Profisix onwards all Gossen professional meters incorporated both ambient and flash measurement.

Dates when availability of models ceased are uncertain.

1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993
Lunasix Lunasix 3 Lunasix F Multisix Variosix F
Profisix Mastersix
Sixtron Sixtronet
Spot-Master
"Multi" series
"Profi" series
Flash
Spot

Cameras with Gossen meters

Notes

  1. This history is derived from E. van der Aa, "History of the Gossen company, Paul Gossen Co. K.-G., Fabrik elektrischer Messgeräte" (2010), within E. van der Aa's website Exposuremeters.net. Accessed 3 April 2011.

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