Difference between revisions of "Dekko"

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==Links==
 
==Links==
* Spennemann, Dirk HR (2015) [https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280111655 History, Description and Technical Details of the GW Target Aircraft Cameras designed for testing the performance of guided weapons during the Cold War era.] CAMERA | TOPIA (Albury, NSW). 34pp, ISBN 978 1 921220 17 3; DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3864.9449
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* Spennemann, Dirk HR (2015) [https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280111655 History, Description and Technical Details of the GW Target Aircraft Cameras designed for testing the performance of guided weapons during the Cold War era.] CAMERA | TOPIA (Albury, NSW). 34pp, <nowiki>ISBN</nowiki> 978 1 921220 17 3; DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3864.9449
 
* Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2015) [http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~dspennem/ReportStore/Dekko_GW1_Mk1A_Walkaround.pdf Photographic Walk-Around of the Target Aircraft Camera Dekko GW1 Mk 1A.] [CAMERA|TOPIA] (Albury, NSW).  6 pp. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4766.0644
 
* Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2015) [http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~dspennem/ReportStore/Dekko_GW1_Mk1A_Walkaround.pdf Photographic Walk-Around of the Target Aircraft Camera Dekko GW1 Mk 1A.] [CAMERA|TOPIA] (Albury, NSW).  6 pp. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4766.0644
 
* Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2015) [http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~dspennem/ReportStore/Dekko_GW1_Mk1C_Walkaround.pdf Photographic Walk-Around of the Target Aircraft Camera Dekko GW1 Mk 1C.] [CAMERA|TOPIA] (Albury, NSW).  8 pp. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3602.8008  
 
* Spennemann, Dirk H.R. (2015) [http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~dspennem/ReportStore/Dekko_GW1_Mk1C_Walkaround.pdf Photographic Walk-Around of the Target Aircraft Camera Dekko GW1 Mk 1C.] [CAMERA|TOPIA] (Albury, NSW).  8 pp. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3602.8008  
  
* [http://www.pathefilm.freeserve.co.uk/95gear.htm 9.5 mm equipment catalogue]
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* [http://www.pathefilm.uk/95gear.htm 9.5 mm equipment catalogue] at [http://www.pathefilm.uk/index.html Grahame Newnham's Web Pages]
 
* [http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com/html/body_9_5_mm_camera_page2.html 9.5mm cameras] (Anna & Terry Vacini Binocular and Cine Collection
 
* [http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com/html/body_9_5_mm_camera_page2.html 9.5mm cameras] (Anna & Terry Vacini Binocular and Cine Collection
  

Latest revision as of 17:37, 7 July 2017

Between the 1930s and 1950s Dekko Cameras Ltd[1][2] produced a range of cine cameras for civilian application.[3] Dekko manufactured some cameras suitable for recording missile approaches, such as the Dekko GW 1. In addition, Dekko produced a range of projectors for 8mm, 9.5mm and 16mm format.[4]

Civilian Cameras

  • Dekko Standard (1934)—a Bakelite 9.5mm camera (1.2kg, 59x125x133 mm)[5][6] on record with:
  • Dekko 104 DeLuxe (1935)—a bakelite 9.5mm camera, 8-64 fps, could shoot stills (1.45 kg, 59x125x150 mm) on record with:
  • Dekko 110 (1947)—a metal 8mm camera fitted with National Optic Anastigmat f/2.5 12.5mm
  • Dekko 128 (1950)—a 8mm camera (0.9 kg, 63x127x127 mm) with National Optic Anastigmat f/2.5 12.5mm
  • Wray Dekko 20mm Anastigmat F/3.5[8]


Military Cameras

During World War II the company had also designed the Dekko type N model 136 (1940) aircraft magazine camera. After World War II it was approached by the Royal Air Force to develop a high speed camera to record missile strikes on target aircraft (the Dekko GW 1).[9] Even though the latter was technically a high speed cine camera, shooting at 100 frames/second, the resulting negatives were not projected as a film but examined individually in order to assess the miss distance of the missile in relation to its target.

It seems that Dekko withdrew from the civilian movie camera market in the late 1950s and expanded into the business of electronics instrumentation.[10] High speed cameras for research and instrumentation purposes continued to be produced,[11] as were adaptations of movie cameras to single shot devices for data recording of experiments.[12]

Links

Notes

British companies
Adams & Co. | Agilux | Aldis | APeM | Aptus | Artima | Barnet Ensign | Beard | Beck | Benetfink‎ | Billcliff | Boots | British Ferrotype | Butcher | Chapman | Cooke | Corfield | Coronet | Dallmeyer | Dekko | De Vere | Dixons | Dollond | Elliott | Gandolfi | Gnome | Griffiths | G. Hare | Houghtons | Houghton-Butcher | Hunter | Ilford | Jackson | Johnson | Kentmere | Kershaw-Soho | Kodak Ltd. | Lancaster | Lejeune and Perken | Lizars | London & Paris Optic & Clock Company | Marion | Marlow | Meagher | MPP | Neville | Newman & Guardia | Pearson and Denham | Perken, Son and Company | Perken, Son & Rayment | Photopia | Purma | Reid & Sigrist | Reynolds and Branson | Ross | Ross Ensign | Sanderson | Sands & Hunter | Shackman | Shew | Soho | Standard Cameras Ltd | Taylor-Hobson | Thornton-Pickard | Underwood | United | Watkins | Watson | Wynne's Infallible | Wray
  1. Addresses:1934-1938: Slough, Buckinghamshire; 1938-1950s: Telford Way, East Acton, London, W3, UK
  2. 'Dekko' is (more or less obsolete) British slang meaning 'look', derived from a Hindi word.
  3. For patents held by Dekko see: Perfectionnements aux chargeurs de film pour caméras. Inventors Alan Percy Smith and Henry Arthur Bence-Trower. Applicant Dekko Cameras Ltd. Application date 25 August 1938. Publication date 14 June 1939. French Patent nº FR 842562 (A).—Improvements in or relating to cinematograph projectors. Inventors Dekko Cameras Ltd. and Frederick Wheeler Stanley. Applicant Dekko Cameras Ltd. Application date 28 February 1948; Publication date 6 January 1952. British patent nº GB 665136 (A).
  4. Dekko 1 (1937?), 9.5mm projector with crank 60 ft reels 40V. 15W; Dekko 2 (1937?), 9.5mm projector with motor 60 ft reels 40V. 15W; Dekko 3 (1939), 9.5mm projector with crank 50V 25W; Dekko 4 (1939), 9.5mm projector with motor 50V. 25W; Dekko 5 (1939), 9.5mm projector 400 ft; Dekko 6 (1939), 9.5mm projector 400 ft; Dekko 7 (1939), 9.5mm projector 400 ft; Dekko 8 (1939), 9.5mm projector 400 ft; Dekko 48 (1939), 9.5mm projector 100/115V. 50 W. 400 ft.; Dekko 118a (1947), 8mm projector 500 W; Dekko 118b (1947), 8mm projector 500 W; Dekko 118c (1947), 8mm projector 500 W; Dekko 119a (1947), 9.5mm projector 110V. 500 W.; Dekko 119b (1947), 9.5mm projector 110V. 500W; Dekko 119c (1947), 9.5mm projector 110V. 750W; Dekko 126A (1949), 16mm projector 500W; Dekko 126B (1949), 16mm projector 500W; Dekko 126C (1949), 16mm projector 500W.—See also: Dekko Cameras Ltd. (1952) Projector for 16 mm cinematograph films. Journal of Scientific Instruments vol. 29 nº 2, pp. 62-63.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 9.5mm cameras (Anna & Terry Vacini Binocular and Cine Collection).
  6. Advertisement The Straits Times, 4 April 1935, Page 1 Column 2.
  7. National Media Museum / Science & Society
  8. Lens only, has three holes on flange, one section of flange is a straight cut: Ebay 110729130708 (August 2011)
  9. Spennemann, Dirk HR (2012) History, Description and Technical Details of the GW Target Aircraft Cameras. vers. 1.0 {: CAMERA | TOPIA :}
  10. ‘The Industry’ ‘’Flight’’ 29 July 1957, p. 145
  11. Coleman, K R (1967) Some recent work on the photography of transient events. ‘’Journal of Scientific Instruments’’ vol 44 nº 5, pp. 321
  12. Howell, R.S (1963) The Flight Recorder. Appendix 2 to: W.F. Fielding, Kinetic and solar heating of 1000lb bombs examined at R.A.F. Idris, August-September 1962. Technical Note WE 13. Farnborough: Royal Aircraft Establishment. Page 16