Alpin

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The Alpin[1] are horizontal folding bed plate cameras made by Voigtländer (Braunschweig/Germany) from 1907 to 1928.[2] Conceptually, the Alpin is a further development of the Metall-Heliar-Kamera, a 180mm horizontal folding bed plate camera with a cast aluminium body and fitted with a focal plane shutter (introduced in 1903 and built until 1920).[3]

Common to all Alpin cameras is a cast aluminium body with a heavy folding bed, double- and later triple-extension bellows, and a single focussing wheel at the photographer's right.[4] A Teletubus with 2½× magnification can be mounted inside the unfolded camera.[5] Tourists liked the camera because it was quite compact when folded, provided a horizontal format suitable for landscapes and group photographs, and it was made of light metal. It was produced in two plate sizes (9x12 and 10x15, the latter for panorama and stereo imagery) and offered in a wide variety of lens combinations. The Alpin is not to be confused with the horizontal version of the Voigtländer Avus 9x12 which only had a standard bellows.[6]

The design of the Voigtländer Alpin influenced other camera manufacturers to create similar cameras. A close copy of the second version is Rokuoh Sha's' horizontal Lily which was offered from 1916 to 1930. Similar developments by other German manufacturers were the Bentzin Rechteck Primar (10 x 15 stereo, ~1912), the Ernemann Heag XII Modell III (9x12, 10 x15 and stereo, ~1912), the Rietzschel Heli Clack (10x15, Stereo, 1913), the Ica Toska (9x12 and 10 x 15 panorama & stereo, 1914), the Ica Reicka (9x12), the Ihagee Venus (9x12, 1916), the Orion Rio 44C (9x12, 1921), the Perka Silar (9x12 and 10x15, 1922); the Rietzschel and later Agfa Ninon ( 9x12, 1925), the Ica and later Zeiss-Ikon Universal Juwel (model 275/7 9X12, 1927), and an offering by Laack (9x12 and stereo).

Contents

9x12 format

The rectangular front standard of the camera has a flat upper and lower margin and allows for rise and fall as well as lateral movements. The camera has two tripod sockets, one on the base and one on the left hand side of the camera.

Version 1, 1905-07

The Alpin appeared on the market in 1906 to a generally favourable reception.[7] The triple expansion camera allowed that the bellows could be extended to 215mm (8½ inch).[8] The first version has a pop-up Newton finder at the top left, which, when folded down, is fully inside the casing.[9] The finder frame is quadrangular with a thin cross-hair etched in. The vertical elevation of the front standard has distinct slots in which both the arrester tightening screw and a guide pin are moving. The tripod socket on the left side of the cameras is located at the bottom.

The folding bed of the camera shows exposed aluminium that has been ornamented with an irregular squiggly pattern applied by a dremel. As the pattern is applied by hand, no camera bed is exactly the same in appearance. The unpainted metal face of the Koilos shutter shows a similar irregular pattern.

The first version introduced in 1905 carried the name of the camera between (German-style) quotation marks („Alpin”) at the top left of the front standard, and the name and place of the manufacturer at the top right as a two-line inscription (Voigtländer, | Braunschweig).

From the start Voigtländer offered two versions of the camera, the Standard model which was covered with black Morocco leather, and a Tropical model (the 'Metall-Alpin-Kamera'), where the outside of the metal housing was textured and covered with black bake enamelled paint.[10]

Sales
Sales information for this version is available from Germany [11] and the United Kingdom.[12]


Types

Two types can be distinguished, with Type A so far only known from an advertisement.[13]. In Type A the sled with the front standard is pulled out via a curved metal wire while in Type B the more familiar finger grips are used. Type A cameras also have a traditional Brillant viewfinder attached the front standard whereas Type B has the Newton finder.[14]


Lens options

The first version of the Alpin was offered with three focal lengths, 120mm, 135mm and 150mm, all set in either Bausch & Lomb Automat, Compound or Koilos shutters.[15] In addition, Voigtländer marketed the Teleansatz 97 mm (c.1908), a telephoto attachment of 2.5x magnification that attached to the rear of the 12cm and 132mm primary lenses inside the bellows (and screwed to the rear of the lens panel).[16] The following lens and shutter combinations are on record:

120mm

135mm

150mm

  • Dynar f/5.5 150mm
  • Triple Anastigmat f/7 150mm

Version 2, 1908-28

The new Alpin was first advertised in the British press in 1908.[21] The triple expansion camera measures 146 x 111 x 38 mm (5¾ x 4⅜ x 1½ inches) and weighs 765g (1 lb 11 oz).[22]

The camera has a fold-up Newton finder at the top left, which, when folded down, remains external, but is flush with the casing. The top of the finder frame has an apex, while the glass has red cross-hairs etched in. A folding Brillant-type finder which attached to the front standard could be purchased as an extra option.[23] The leather hand strap, with an embossed 'Voigtländer' name tag, is at the right hand side of the body, while tripod sockets are locate the the bottom and the centre of the left side of the body . The fold-out cover for the focussing screen is embossed „Alpin”. The catch for the front door is released by pressing a button on the top plate.[24] The major technical change is the way the vertical elevation of the front standard is handled. While in Version 1 the standard has distinct slots in which both the arrester tightening screw and a guide pin are moving, version 2 does away with these and merely has an arrester tightening screw, permanently located ¼ down from the top. The Alpin is a triple-extension camera operated by a spiral rack and pinion with a lock. A large focussing wheel is at the right fore edge of the fold-down front door. This model was produced until 1928.[25]

Sales History

Based on available catalogues and advertisements in journals and newspapers, the Alpin was formally distributed in Germany,[26] Austria, Switzerland,[27] the United Kingdom,[28] the USA,[29], Austria and France.The distribution structure is not fully clear, but it would appear that from 1911 to about 1926 Voigtländer handled its own distribution of the Alpin rather than relying on major local distributors. Indeed, the situation in France was such that Voigtländer was apparently not stocked by the main French camera houses until 1927/28 [30]. Thus there are no listings for the Alpin in the catalogues of any of the major Paris retailers such as Omnium-Photo, Photo-Hall, Photo-Plait, Photo-Sport or Tiranty. The only French listings of the Alpin that could be found occurred pre World War I, contained in the catalogue of the mail order house Manufacture Français d'Armes et Cycles de Saint-Ètienne.[31]

Types

Three types have been observed which show a number of technical as well as cosmetic differences. They can be best distinguished by the lettering variations of the front standard:[32]
     Type A: normal script: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with 'Braunschweig' below) at right (1907-1909)
     Type B: running script horizontal: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r' ) at right (1906–1910?)
     Type C: running script set at 30° inclination:
          Variant 1: Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r' ) at left and „Alpin” at right (~1907)
          Variant 2: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r') at right (1910?–1930)

Types A and B seem to occur concurrent, at least in the early part, with the lens serial numbers intermingled. It is quite possible that these lettering types represent cameras marketed for German-speaking countries (type A) and the rest of the world (type B).[33] It can be surmised that the special lettering was dropped in favour of a universal labelling.

Type A (1907-1909)

The lettering of the front board is rendered in normal script: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with 'Braunschweig' below) at right.[34]

Type B (1906-1910)

The lettering of the front board is rendered in running script horizontal: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r') at right. The changes between the Type A and Type B bodies are mainly of a cosmetic nature. The tripod socket on the left side of the cameras is now located in the centre rather than at the bottom. In TYpe B the finger grips for the sled of the front standard are both thicker and are set forward a bit more, making it easier to grip them when sliding out the sled. The front standard was redesigned is is now made of single U-shaped fork piece into which the front board is slotted. In addition, the sides of the bellows of Type B units have a small metal loop on on of the folds to prevent the bellows from sagging when the second and third extension are not fully extended.[35] This camera is a common model on the collector's market.[36]


Type C (1910-1930)

Overall, the edges of the casing of metal body are now rounded rather than crisp as in the previous models. The struts holding the folding bed are now broader and stronger. The principal technical changes introduced with type C are that the focussing wheel has been moved inwards from the right fore edge of the folding bed and now runs in a slot, some 5mm from the edge. We can presume that this design modification was introduced to prevent accidental focus adjustment. The front standard has been redesigned. The vertical movement of the front board is arrested by a single screw, now placed at the very top of the right side of U-shaped fork rather than having two screws ¼ down as in the previous model. The finger grips for the sled have been slightly enlarged and placed on a spring-loaded fold-down unit, which allows for an easier grip, especially for larger hands.

A range of lenses was observed, but from 1913 onwards all units seem to have a Compur Shutter.

Variant 1
The lettering of the front board is rendered in running script set at 30° inclination:Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r') running script 30° inclination at left and „Alpin” running script 30° inclination at right.[37] One example has been observed fitted with a Collinear III f/6.8 132mm in a Compound shutter. The serial number of that lens suggests a manufacture of 1907,[38] which would make it contemporary with Types A and B.[39] Another example has been observed with a Heliar f/4.5 13.5cm with a serial number dating to 1924.[40]

Variant 2
The lettering of the front board is rendered in running script set at 30° inclination: „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer (with top swirl from the 'r' ) at right. This became the uniform pattern of lettering from about 1911 onwards. One example has been observed fitted with a Collinear III f/6.8 12cm in a Koilos shutter. The serial number of that lens suggests a manufacture of 1905,[41] which would make it contemporary with Types A and B.[42] The camera is the most common model on the collector's market.[43]

Lens options

The second version of the Alpin was offered in various focal ranges, broadly speaking 120mm, 135mm and 150mm, all set in Compound, Koilos or Compur shutters. In addition, Voigtländer marketed the Teleansatz 97 mm (c.1908), a telephoto attachment of 2.5x magnification that attached to the rear of the 12cm and 132mm primary lenses inside the bellows (and screwed to the rear of the lens panel).[44] On record are the following lens and shutter combinations:

120mm

4¾inch (120.5 mm)

132mm

135mm

150mm

  • Dynar f/5.5 150mm
  • Triple Anastigmat f/7 150mm

Varied

  • Collinear Satzanastigmat with 6 different focal lengths f/7 to f/12.5[53].
  • Telephoto attachment, which screwed onto the rear cell inside the bellows and gave a 2.5x magnification.[54]

In addition, an Alpin was observed fitted with a Voigtar f/6.3 10.5cm,[55] which is most likely a post-market modification with a lens and shutter unit salvaged from a Voigtländer Bessa.

Version 3, Alpin Rapid (~1925)

The Alpin Rapid was a prototype for a development that was not followed through.[56] A camera with red, single extension bellows. The fold-down front bed has a deep recess to allow for the bulging Skopar in Turbo Shutter. The canera has red spirit-filled bubble levels on top and on left side. An expandable waist-level viewfinder mounted on the top of the camera. Fitted with Anastigmat Skopar f/4.5 13.5cm in Voigtländer Turbo Shutter.

10 x15 format

Soon after the introduction of the 9x12 model, Voigtländer realised that there was a market for a wider format, more suitable for landscapes and group photographs. In consequence, the 10 x 15 version was introduced.[57] The camera has a fold-up Newton finder in the center, which, when folded down, is external, but flush with the casing. The top of the finder frame has an apex, while the glass shows etched-in red cross-hairs. The front standard has a curved, higher central section and lacks the lettering that is present on the 9x12 model.[58]

Version 1, 1908-14

The triple expansion camera measures 180 x 121 x 57 mm (7⅛ x 4¾ x 2¼ inches) and weighs 1190g (2 lb 10 oz).[59]


Lens options

The camera was offered in three focal lengths, 165mm, 180mm and 210mm, all set in either Compound or Koilos shutters.[60] In addition, Voigtländer marketed the Teleansatz 97 mm (c.1908), a telephoto attachment of 2.5x magnification that attached to the rear of the 12cm and 132mm primary lenses inside the bellows (and screwed to the rear of the lens panel).[61] The following lens and shutter combinations are on record:

165mm

180mm

210mm

Varied

  • Collinear Satzanastigmat with 6 different focal lengths


Version 2, 1915-25

The second version of the 10 x 15 Alpin saw the introduction of an additional focussing wheel on the photographer's left. The finger grips for the sled have been slightly enlarged and placed on a spring-loaded fold-down unit, which allows for an easier grip, especially for larger hands. [63] A folding Brillant-type finder which attached to the front standard could be purchased as an extra option.[64] The front extension (of the triple extension bellows) has a special scissor strut support system that ensures rigidity and prevents the bellows from sagging.[65]

Version 3, 1926-28

Lens options

The camera was offered as a 'postcard' camera in three focal length, 165mm, 180mm and 210mm, all set in Compound or Compur shutters:

165mm

180mm

210mm

Varied

  • Collinear Satzanastigmat with 6 different focal lengths, f.6.3 to f/12.5[71].

Stereo Alpin

9 x 12 format Stereo

A 9 x 12 format Alpin Stereo is mentioned in the Voigtländer Katalog of 1907.[72]

10x15 format Stereo

The Stereo Alpine replaced the Stereo-Panoramic Camera of 1906 which had a focal plane shutter fashioned akin to the Metall-Heliar-Kamera.[74] From the start Voigtländer offered two versions of the camera, the Standard model which was covered with black leather, and a Tropical model (the 'Metall-Streo-Kamera'), where the outside of the metal housing was textured and covered with black bake enamelled paint.[75]

Alpin Stereo, two-lens version 1909-1914

The first version of the Stereo Alpine became available in 1911 and was offered until the end of production in 1928.[76] It came in two versions, the pure stereo with dual lens and shutters[77]


The body of the stereo camera was the same as that of the 10 x 15 format camera, with the exception that the stereo camera had a light-tight partition to allow for two exposures (removable in the case of the three-lens version).

Lens Options

Two Collinear f/6.3 105mm in Stereo Compur shutter for the stereo option.

Alpin Stereo, three-lens version 1909-1914

Voigtländer introduced a new version of the Alpine Stereo, a three-lens version that allowed to take both stereo and, via a centrally placed lens, also panorama images The body of the stereo camera was the same as that of the 10 x 15 format camera, with the exception that the stereo camera had a light-tight partition to allow for two exposures, which was removable for panorama shost.[78]

Lens Options

Two Collinear f/6.3 105mm in Stereo Compound shutter for the stereo option and a centrally located Collinear III f/6.8 150mm for the Panorama option.

Alpin Stereo three-lens version 1915–

In 1915 Voigtländer introduced a new three-lens version of the Alpine Stereo, and seems to have abandoned the sales of the pure stereo version.[80]

Lens Options

Two Collinear f/6.3 105mm for the stereo option and a centrally located Collinear III f/6.8 150mm for the Panorama option set in a triple-action Compound shutter.[81]

The 1915 version of the 10 x 15 Alpin saw the introduction of an additional focussing wheel on the photographer's left.[82]


Advertisements

Advertisements in Newspapers and Professional Journals


Advertising Signs


Notes

  1. Spelled 'Alpine' in U.S. advertisements
  2. In the United Kingdom no longer listed after 1925 (included in Voigtländer advertisement British Journal Photographic Almanac [Henceforth BJPA] 1925, p. 746; no longer listed in 1926).—It is still listed for Switzerland in Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124-125.—But longer included in the 1930 Voigtländer catalogue ('Sein Stolz, eine Voigtländer.' Nr 2308/430. Braunschweig: Voigtländer & Sohn.—See also overview page Alpin at ukcamera.
  3. Metall-Heliar-Kamera
  4. Later versions of the Alpin 10x15 had dual focussing wheels.
  5. The "Alpine" Telephoto attachment. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1909, p. 722.
  6. Horizontal Avus (1914-1926).
  7. e.g. The Alpine Camera. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1907, p. 904.—Voigtländer was rather proud of its camera: the 1907 Voigtländer Katalog has an Alpin on the Cover (Voigtländer Objektive und Apparate für Photographie 1907).
  8. The Alpine Camera. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1907, p. 904.
  9. Similar design on this unnamed camera with a French lens and shutter combination.
  10. The Tropical model was sold with RMk 5 premium: Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  11. Documented price points in Germany: Collinear III f/6.3 12cm: in Koilos or Compound 1907–RMk 200; Collinear III 135cm: in Koilos or Compound 1907–RMk 210; Triple Anastigmat 12cm: in Koilos or Compound 1907–RMk 170; Sources: 1907— Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  12. Documented price points in the United KIngdom: Collinear III f/6.3 12cm: in Koilos 1907—£9/–; Collinear III 135cm: in Koilos 1907–£9/10; Dynar nº 1 f/6 4¾ inch [=12cm] in Bausch & Lomb Automat 1906–£8/-; in Koilos 1907–£7/15; Sources: 1906—Advertisement in BJPA 1906, p. 1370B; 1907—Advertisement in BJPA 1907, p. 1347;
  13. "The Alpin Camera." Advertisement in BJPA 1906, p. 1370B.
  14. Documented serial numbers for Type B ( „Alpin” normal script and Voigtländer | Braunschweig normal script): Collinear III f/6.8 12cm sn 83546 (lens date 1906) in Koilos Kazutaka Tsutsui on Flickr; see also Alpin; in Koilos (Breker March 2006, Lot 122); in Compound (camerascollection.blogspot); Voigtländer Cooke Lens sn 90101 (lens date 1907) in Koilos (Breker April 2005 Lot 231 (red bellows));
  15. There are two spellings for the better quality lens used: Collinear and Kollinear. It would appear that the latter is the late 1920s spelling.
  16. Early Photography
  17. Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  18. Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  19. Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  20. Seen in a Polish on-line auction July 2009.
  21. The Voigtländer Alpine camera. BJPA 1908, p. 1135.
  22. The Voigtländer Alpine camera. BJPA 1908, p. 1135.
  23. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38.
  24. Unlike many other cameras this button is exposed rather than covered by the leather.
  25. No longer included in the 1930 catalogue ('Sein Stolz, eine Voigtländer.' Nr 2308/430. Braunschweig: Voigtländer & Sohn.
  26. Documented price points in Germany: Collinear f/6.3 12cm: in Koilos 1912–RMk 230; Dynar f/5.5 135mm: in Koilos 1912–RMk 205; Sources: 1912—Newspaper advertisement (on web, no further bibliographic data).
  27. Documented price points in Switzerland: Kollinear III f/6.8 132mm: in Compur 1927–CHF 276 Dynar f/5.5 135mm: in Compur 1927–CHF 264 Heliar f/4.5 135mm: in Compur 1927–CHF 294 Collinear Satzanastigmat with 6 different focal lengths f/7 to f/12.5 1927–CHF 366 Sources: 1927–Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124.
  28. Documented price points in the United Kingdom: Dynar f/5.5 4¾inch [=12cm] in Compound 1908–£8/15; 1909–£10/5; 1910–£10/5; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£10/5; in Compound 1912–£10/5; 1913–£10/5; 1914–£10/5; Dynar f/5.5 5 3/8inch [=13.5cm] in Koilos 1910–£10/15; in Koilor or Compound 1911–£10/15; in Compound 1912–£10/15; 1913–£10/15; 1914–£10/15; Dynar f/5.5 15cm in Koilos or Compound 1910–£11/5; 1911–£11/5; in Compound 1912–£11/5; 1913–£11/5; Collinear f/6.3 4¾inch [=12cm] in Compound 1910–£11/14; 1914–£11/10; Collinear f/6.3 12cm: in Koilos 1908–£10/–; 1909–£11/10; 1910–£11/14; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£11/10in Compound 1912–£11/10; 1913–£11/10; Collinear f/6.3 5¼inch [=13.5cm] in Compound 1908–£10/10; 1909–£12/–; 1910–£12/4; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£12/–; in Compound 1912–£12/–; 1913–£12/–; 1914–£12/–; in Compur 1925–£16/16; Heliar f/4.5 13.5cm in Compur 1925–£17/17 .—Sources: 1908—BJPA, p. 1135; 1909—BJPA, p. 119; 1910–Photographic Cameras, Lenses and Accessories [Catalogue] 1910 Voigtländer & Sohn AG [Printed by Curis & Beanish, Coventry], p. 85; 1910–BJPA 1910, p. 1068-69; 1911—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1912—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1913—BJPA 1913, p. 1099; 1914–BJPA 1914, p. 1119; Voigtländer did not advertise in the BJPA 1915-1924; 1925—BJPA 1925, p. 746.
  29. Documented price points in the USA: Collinear f/6.3: in Koilos 1908–US$ 60 Collinear II f/5.4 16.5cm in Compur 1915-$74; Collinear III f/6.8 16.5cm in Compur 1915-$70; 19xx—US$ 75 Heliar f/4.5 135mm: in Compur 19xx—US$ 80 Sources: 1908–(Burr McIntosh Monthly (New York), vol. 18 nº 69, December 1908); 1915–Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38-39; 19xx–(Advertisement Motion Picture Apparatus Co, New York);
  30. The only exception are the irregular listings of the Voigtländer Stereoflektoscop.
  31. Price points in France: Collinear f/6.3: in Koilos 1908 & 1909–FFrancs 263; 1910–FFrancs 300 Dynar f/5.5 135mm: in Koilos 1908 & 1909–FFrancs 220; 1910–FFrancs 258 Sources 1908-1910: Catalogue Manufacture Français d'Armes et Cycles de Saint-Ètienne 1908, p. 587; 1909, p. 475; 1910, p. 526.—
  32. The dating of the three lettering variants is based primarily on an analysis of the observed serial numbers of the lenses.
  33. The rationale for this assumption is that Type A also carries the town name 'Braunschweig' which is the spelling in German-speaking countries (i.e. Germany, Austria and part of Switzerland) while it is spelled 'Brunswick' in both French and English.
  34. Documented serial numbers of Type A („Alpin” normal script and Voigtländer | Braunschweig normal script): Collinear III f/6.3 132mm sn 99071 (lens date 1908) in Compound (eBay 320965243662, August 2012); sn 101698 (lens date 1909) in Compur (eBay 120953995217, July 2012); Dynar f/6 12cm sn 88592 (lens date 1907) in Koilos *Pierre Dalger);
  35. Presumably, a metal rod would have been slid in there.
  36. Documented serial numbers („Alpin” running script horizontal, and Voigtländer running script horizontal): Collinear IIInº2 f/6.8 4¾inch: sn 84424 (lens date 1906) in Koilos (eBay 200800224776, August 2012 with US Patent nº on lens); .—Collinear III f/6.8 12cm: sn 101422 (lens date 1908) in Koilos (eBay 350485857317; September 2011); .—Collinear III f/6.8 4¾inch: sn 105058 (lens date 1909) in Compound (Kazutaka Tsutsui via Flickr); .—Collinear III f/6.8 132mm: sn 98496 (lens date 1908) in Compound (Photo Rahn Photographica Auction 5 Lot 424); sn 103198 (lens date 1909) in Compound (W Boisen via Flickr); .—Dynar f/5.5 12cm: sn 84815 (lens date 1906) in B&L Automat (Early Photography);
  37. Documented examples (running script 30° inclination, Voigtländer with top swirl from the 'r' at left and „Alpin” at right)" Collinear III f/6.8 132mm: sn 96492 (lens date 1907) in Compound (kasafo.de);
  38. For dating Voigtländer lenses via their serial numbers, see this wiki page.
  39. Until other examples can be documented it cannot be ruled out that this is a later modification.
  40. Seen on eBay December 2012
  41. For dating Voigtländer lenses via their serial numbers, see this wiki page.
  42. Until other examples can be documented it cannot be ruled out that this is a later modification.
  43. Documented examples (running script 30° inclination, „Alpin” at left and Voigtländer with top swirl from the 'r' at right): Collinear III f/6.3 12cm: in Compur (camerascollection.blogspot.com.au); sn 80028 (lens date 1905) in Compound (Photo 1; Photo 2; Leicashop); .—Kollinear II.2 f/5.4 4¾inch: sn 123208 (lens date 1913) in Compur (fotocommunity.com); sn 127131 (lens date 1914) in Compur (eBay 350589311980, August 2012); .—Kollinear III f/6.8 132mm: sn 112086 (lens date 1911) in Compound (on enamelled Voigtländer advertising sign); .—Kollinear III f/6.8 132mm: sn 134783 (lens date 1915) in Compur (Fotoauktioner Auktion 26, October, 2012, Lot 191); sn 138148 (lens date 1916) in Compur (Cinci's site); sn 140305 (lens date 1917) in Compur (Cinci's site); sn 161564 (lens date 1921) in Compur (ebay 180864519313, April 2012); sn 161800 (lens date 1921) in Compur (eBay 270910952019; February 2012); .—Heliar f/4.5 13.5cm: sn 169120 (lens date 1921) in Compur (Cinci's site); sn 176778 (lens date 1922) in Compur (ebay Feb 2012); sn 189992 (lens date 1922) in Compur Kazutaka Tsutsui via Flickr in Compur (retronom.hu); .—In addition, observed were a Voigtar f/6.3 10.5cm (Yahoo Japan, October 2012); and a Goerz (Berlin) Dagor 130 mm (ebay 370341407741, April 2010)
  44. Early Photography
  45. Pierre Dalger
  46. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38-39.
  47. Catalogue Manufacture Français d'Armes et Cycles de Saint-Ètienne 1908, p. 587; 1909, p. 475; 1910, p. 526 (catalogue page depicted in the catalogue section of the Alpin entry at Sylvain Halgand's site).
  48. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38-39.—Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124.
  49. Catalogue Manufacture Français d'Armes et Cycles de Saint-Ètienne 1908, p. 587; 1909, p. 475; 1910, p. 526 (catalogue page depicted in the catalogue section of the Alpin entry at Sylvain Halgand's site).
  50. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124.
  51. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124.
  52. s/n 224638; Seen on eBay December 2012).
  53. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 124.
  54. The "Alpine" Telephoto attachment. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1909, p. 722.
  55. Seen in an on-line auction, Yahoo Japan, October 2012
  56. From the former Voigtländer-Museum in Braunschweig. Breker September 2006, Lot 175; Breker Mach 2009, Lot 127
  57. Documented Price Points: UNITED KINDOM Collinear III f/6.3 15cm in Koilos 1910–£17/10; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£17/10; in Compound 1912–£17/10; 1913–£17/10; 1914–£15/5; in Compur 1925–£22/0; Heliar II f/4.5 15cm in Compur 1925–£24/17; Sources: 1910–BJPA 1910, p. 1068-69; 1911—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1912—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1913—BJPA 1913, p. 1099; 1914–BJPA 1914, p. 1119; Voigtländer did not advertise in the BJPA 1915-1924; 1925—BJPA 1925, p. 746; .— UNITED STATES Collinear II f/5.4 16.5cm in Compur 1915-$97; Collinear III f/6.8 16.5cm in Compur 1915-$92; Sources: 1915–Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38-39;
  58. Documented serial numbers: Collinear f/6.3 sn 97983 (lens date 1907) in Compound (Christies Sale 7145, March 1996, Lot 337); Collinear f/6.3 16.5cm sn 132247 (lens date 1914) in Compur (www.blende-und-zeit); Collinear f/12.5 15cm sn 618505 (lens date ~1930) (Westlicht auction nº 4, November 2003, Lot 360); Goerz Doppel Anastigmat sn 245054 in Compound (kasafo.de);
  59. The Voigtländer Alpine camera. BJPA 1911, p. 1076.
  60. Documented Price Points: SWITZERLAND: Collinear f/6.3 165mm in Compur 1927: CHF 404; .— Dynar f/5.5 165mm in Compur 1927: CHF 390 .— Heliar f/4.5 165mm in Compur 1927: CHF 442; .— Heliar f/4.5 180mm in Compur 1927: CHF 462; .— Heliar f/4.5 210mm in Compur 1927: CHF 526; .— Collinear Satzanastigmat with 6 different focal lengths, f.6.3 to f/12.5 1927: CHF 492; .—Sources: 1927—Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.— UNITED KINGDOM: Collinear f/5.5 15cm: [=6 inch] in Compound 1910–£17/10; 1914–£15/5; Sources: 1910–Voigtländer Catalogue 1910, p. 88; also: British Journal Photographic Almanac 1910, p. 1069; 1914–British Journal Almanac 1914, p. 1119
  61. Earky Photography
  62. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.39.
  63. Illustration in Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38.
  64. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38.
  65. Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann, image to be added when camera is in hand.
  66. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  67. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  68. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  69. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  70. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  71. Hausamann & Co (1927) Hand- und Preisbuch. St. Gallen (Switzerland): Hausamann & Co. p. 125.
  72. Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  73. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1910, p. 1069
  74. The 'Voigtlander" Stereo-Panoramic Camera. British Journal Photographic Almanac 1907, pp. 904-905.
  75. Sold with RMk 5 premium: Voigtländer Katalog 1907, p. 29.
  76. No longer included in the 1930 catalogue ('Sein Stolz, eine Voigtländer.' Nr 2308/430. Braunschweig: Voigtländer & Sohn.
  77. Documented Price Points: UNITED KINGDOM Collinear f/5.5 6inch in Koilos 1910–£21/10; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£21/10; in Compound 1912–£21/10; 1913–£21/10; 1914–£19/5; 1925–£17/-; Heliar II f/4.5 15cm in Compur 1925–£24/17; Sources: 1910–Voigtländer Catalogue 1910, p. 88; also: BJPA 1910, p. 1069; 1911—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1913—BJPA 1913, p. 1099; 1914–BJPA 1914, p. 1119; Voigtländer did not advertise in the BJPA 1915-1924; 1925—BJPA 1925, p. 746;
  78. Documented Price Points: UNITED KINGDOM Collinear f/5.5 6inch in Koilos 1910–£29/10; in Koilos or Compound 1911–£29/10; in Compound 1912–£29/10; 1913–£29/10; 1914–£27/3; Sources: 1910–Voigtländer Catalogue 1910, p. 88; also: BJPA 1910, p. 1069; 1911—BJPA, pp. 1076-77; 1913—BJPA 1913, p. 1099; 1914–BJPA 1914, p. 1119; Voigtländer did not advertise in the BJPA 1915-1924;
  79. Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.39.
  80. Documented Price Points: UNITED STATES Collinear f/5.5 6inch in Compur 1915-$165; Sources: 1915–Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.39.
  81. Auktion Team Köln April 2002 Lot 831.— Collinear f/6.3 105mm (sn 112812 & 112813) Collinear III f/6.8 150mm (sn 112814) Westlicht 13, June 2008, Lot 498.—
  82. Illustration in Catalog of Lenses, Cameras Binoculars and Opera Glasses 1915-1916. Voigtlander & Sohn 240-258 E. Ontario St., Chicado, Ill. and 225 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, p.38.
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