Staeble

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History

Camera industry in Munich
Agfa | Deckel | Eder | Enna | Friedrich | Kilfitt | Leitmeyr | Linhof | Niezoldi & Krämer | Perka | Rex | Rietzschel | Staeble | Steinheil


The Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co ('Staeble') was a German company, founded on 5 May 1908 with a capitalisation of 120,000 Reichsmark. Principals were the German scientist, physicist (optics) and mathematician Dr. Franz Staeble (*1876 †1950), and engineers Alfred Neumann[1] and Oskar Jaeger,[2] the latter listed as 'business manager'.[3] The company primarily made lenses for cameras, binoculars, projectors and enlargers, but prior to World War II also produced entire cameras.[4] The company traded under a number name variations.[5] The demand for Staeble lenses was considerable, with the company proudly announcing that more than 25,000 lenses had been manufactured by Spring 1913.[6] This led to a concomittant expansion of the production facilities. In addition to lenses marketed under its own name, Staeble was an OEM who supplied lenses to a range of German manufacturers both prior to and after World War II. In 1930 Rodenstock acquired the patent(s) to some of the Staeble inventions[7] as well as lens designs.[8] By 1938 the company traded as Fotop Jaeger, Friedl & Co suggesting that both Neumann's and Staeble's shares in the company had been bought out salesman Otto Friedl and his wife.[9]

During World War II, and presumably also during World War I, Staeble also manufactured military optics, especially gunsights.The Staeble production facility was based initially in Munich but by 1944[10] was moved to Altenstadt near Schongau am Lech (Bavaria) to escape the threat of Allied bombing raids.[11] By 1952 all of the Staeble-Werk has been acquired by the Friedl, and was renamed Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG.[12] It was bought out by Agfa in 1969.[13]

Cameras

Staeble lenses can be found in a number of no-name cameras distributed by major German mail-order houses, such as KaDeWe prior to World War I.[14] It is quite possible that Staeble provided the camera bodies as well. Specific Staeble models are:

  • Tri-Color Camera (1936)
Tricolor-Camera for 9 x 12 cm plates fitted with "Dr. Staeble Doppel-Anastigmat Choroplast f/6.3 19.5 cm in Compur.[15]
  • Unoplast 10x15 (~1925)
    • with Doppel-Anastigmat f/ 5.4 120 mm in Compound shutter (~1910s)[16]
    • with Doppel-Anastigmat f/ 6.3 165 mm in Compur shutter (~1920s)[17]


Lenses fitted in cameras

Staeble was an OEM who supplied lenses to a range of German manufacturers such as Braun, Contessa-Nettel, Finetta, Kalos, King, Neidig, Potthof, Saraber, Wirgin, Genos, Ising, Kürbi & Niggeloh, Linden, Mozar, Pohlack und Seidel.[18] In addition, Staeble lenses can be found in a number of no-name cameras distributed by major German mail-order houses, such as KaDeWe prior to World War I.[14]

Aeroplast

  • F/6.8 used on the 'Atlanta' balloon camera made by Contessa ca. 1911[19]

Choroplast

  • Series I f/3.9 available as 12, 15, 18, 21, 25, 36 and 48cm[20]
  • Series II f/4.5 available as 12, 15, 18, 21, 25, 36 and 48cm[20]
  • Series III f/6.3 available as 7.5, 10.5, 12, 13.5. 16.5, 19.5, 24, 27.5, 32 and 36cm[20]
  • Series IV f/6.3 available as 7.5, 10.5, 12, 13.5. 16.5, 19.5, 24, 27.5, 32 and 38cm[20]
  • Series IV f/6.8 available as 7.5, 10.5, 12, 13.5. 16.5, 19.5, 24, and 27.5cm[20]

Citonar

supplied to Contessa-Nettel[19]

Citoplast

a double Anastigmat (Doppel-Anastigmat) design

  • f/6.3 13.5cm
    • in Derval shutter in vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with single expansion bellows and fixed front board [14]
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with fully adjustable double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
  • f/6.3 16.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 10 x 15 with single expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]

also supplied to Contessa-Nettel[19]

Color-Ultralit (Braun Color-Ultralit)

Extra-Rapid Aplanat

  • f/7.7 avaiable as 10.5, 13.5 16.5 and 19.5cm[20]
  • f/7.7 13.5cm
    • in Derval shutter in vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with single expansion and fixed board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with fully adjustable double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
  • f/7.7 15.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
  • f/7.7 16.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 10 x 15 with single expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]

Hellaplast

Isoplast

a double Anastigmat (Doppel-Anastigmat) design

  • f5.8
    • fitted in Pixie vest-pocket strut folder[14][24]
  • f/5.8 13.5cm
    • in Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
  • f/5.8 16.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 10 x 15 with single expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]

Kata

Katagon

Kataplast

Kuhn's Anachromat (1928)

the original Imagon[26]

Lineogon

Lineoplast

  • f/11.5 25cm barrel lens[27]
  • f/12.5 available as 6, 9, 13, 15.5, 18, 22, 25.5, 32, 44 and 55cm[20]

Medioplast

Monoplast

  • f/7.7 available as 7.5, 11.5, 14.5, 19.5, 22, 30, 42, and 54cm[20]

Neoplast

Polyplast

Polyplast multi-lens lens set of 1912 with custom mount.[28]

Protoplast

  • f/6.8 available as 9, 12, 13.5, 16.5, 19.5, 24, 27.5, 30 and 36cm[20]

Super-Choro

Super-Ultralit (Braun Super-Ultralit)

Tachyplast

  • f/3.2 available as 15, 18.5, 26, 36 and 48cm[20]

Telon

Telon - R

Telexon

Teronar

supplied to Contessa-Nettel[19]

Tessaplast

a double Anastigmat (Doppel-Anastigmat) design

  • f/5.5 13.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 9 x 12 with fully adjustable double expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]
  • f/5.5 16.5cm
    • in Derval or Ibsor shutter in a no-name vertical plate camera 10 x 15 with single expansion bellows and adjustable front board (vertically and horizontally)[14]

also supplied to Contessa-Nettel[19]

Ultralit

see also Color-Ultralit and Super-Ultralit

Ultraplast

Unoplast

an Anastigmat

Projector lenses

Halogon

Katagon

  • f/2.8 85mm
    • in Noris 500 slide projector[21]
    • in Revue 24JL slide projector[21]

Paxigon

  • f/2.8 85mm
    • in Braun Paximat 200
    • in Braun Paximat 1800 electric slide projector
    • in Braun Paximat Triumph N24
    • in Braun Paximat N 12auto slide projector[21]

Proj.-Kata

Proj.-Katagon

Proj.Trigon

Stellagon

Stellar

  • f/2.8 85mm

Super-Stellagon

  • f/2.8 85mm
    • in Braun Paximat deLuxe N24+J

Suprar

  • f/2.8 85mm

Trigon

Enlarger lenses

Katagon

Telexon – E

  • with a f/5.6 85mm lens witm M39 mount.[21]

Ultragon

Other Optics

Binoculars

mentioned in a 1913 advertisement[31]

Gun Sights / Rifle Scopes

  • Staeble Diana Uniscope 2.2 x 15[32]
    • for Diana Air Rifle[33]

Telescopes

mentioned in a 1913 advertisement[34]


Bibliography

Catalogues

  • Photographische Objektive und Kameras : Katalog Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung. München: Druck der G. Franz'schen Hofbuchdruckerei 1908. 39 pp.
  • Hauptkatalog über photographische Objektive & Kameras, Projektions-Apparate und Fernrohre. Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. G.m.b.H. München, Daiser Str. 15. München: Staeble, 1912. 112pp.
  • Photographische Objektive. Ausgabe 1914. Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co G.m.b.H. München, Daiser Str. 15. München: Staeble, 1914. [exact imprint date15 May 1914]. 64 pp.
  • Photo-Optik und Kameras. Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. G.m.b.H München, Lindwurmstrasse 88. München: Staeble [printed by Graphische Kunstanstalt Josef C. Huber, Diessen vor München], [October] 1926, 52pp.
  • Preisschlüssel m38 in Reichsmark über Photo-Optik, zu Prospekt Nr. 38, gültig ab August 1938. Fotop Jaeger, Friedl & Co, München 15, Lindwurmstrasse 88. 4pp
  • [Polyplast and Neoplast Catalog] Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Schongau. (n.d.) (after 1958) 6pp.

Other

  • Thiele, Hartmut (2008) Staeble-Optik. Die Geschichte des Optischen Werkes, Aufstellung der gesamten Objektivfertigung von 1917 bis 1972. München: Lindemanns Fotobuchhandlung. 72pp.

Patents

Dr. Franz Staeble

  • Vorrichtung zur Bestimmung der richtigen Einstellentfernung und notwendigen Abblendung optischer Instrumente hinsichtlich der Tiefenschärfe. Inventor Dr. Franz Staeble. Applicant Rosenstock Optik GmbH. Filed 7 March 1929, granted 27 April 1931. German Patent DE523739 ©

Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG

  • Fernrohrbildsucher. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 25 September 1952, granted 20 November 1952. German Patent DE1646813 (U)
  • Fotographisches Auswelchesobjektiv verschiedenster Brennweite mit Schneckengang und Irisblende. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 7 March 1953, granted 13 May 1953.German Patent DE1655434 (U)
  • Irisblende. Vorzugsweise für Objektive von automatischen Kameras mit Belichtings- oder Druckblendensteuerung. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 27 February 1960, granted 19 May 1960. German Patent DE1811662 (U)
  • Zielfernrohr für Luftgewehre. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 27 June 1963, granted 4 November 1965. German Patent DE1204424 (B)
  • Projektionsapparat. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 16 July 1965, granted 20 June 1968. German Patent DE1987967 (U)

Links

Notes

  1. 'Ing[engieur]' Alfred Neumann.
  2. 'Dipl[om]-Ing[engieur]' Oskar Jaeger.
  3. Photographische Korrespondenz. Photographische Gesellschaft in Wien, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Photographie vol. 45, 1908, p. 284.— Der Mechaniker vol. 16, 1909, p. 117).
  4. eg. Photographische Objektive und Kameras : Katalog Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung. München: Druck der G. Franz'schen Hofbuchdruckerei 1908.—Photo-Optik und Kameras. Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. München: Staeble, 1926, 52pp.
  5. It was also known as (addresses are given where available):
    Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. G.m.b.H (1912) in München, Daiser Strasse 15 (1912 Catalogue);
    Dr. Staeble-Werk (~1913) in Daiserstrasse 15, München F50 (1913 newspaper advertisement offered on eBay); (1914 Catalogue [see listing]; (1919 newspaper advertisement on Flickr);
    Dr. Staeble-Werk m.b.H. (~1913) in München B 10 (1913 newspaper advertisement offered on eBay);
    Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. (~1914) in München X (newspaper advertisement for May 1914 offered on eBay); (1926) in München 2 SW7, Lindwurmstrasse 88 (1926 Catalogue)
    Fotop Jaeger, Friedl & Co (1938) München 15, Lindwurmstrasse 88 (1938 price list)
    Staeble-Werk or simply
    Dr. Staeble.
  6. Photographische Objektive. Ausgabe 1914. Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co G.m.b.H. München, Daiser Str. 15. München: Staeble, 1914, p. 3.
  7. Vorrichtung zur Bestimmung der richtigen Einstellentfernung und notwendigen Abblendung optischer Instrumente hinsichtlich der Tiefenschärfe. Inventor Dr. Franz Staeble. Applicant Rosenstock Optik GmbH. Filed 7 March 1929, granted 27 April 1931. German Patent DE523739 ©
  8. A History of the Imagon lens by Dr. Alfons Schultz
  9. Preisschlüssel m38 in Reichsmark über Photo-Optik, zu Prospekt Nr. 38, gültig ab August 1938. Fotop Jaeger, Friedl & Co, München 15, Lindwurmstrasse 88. 4pp.
  10. For Munich addresses see a previous footnote
  11. Address 1952/1953: Bahnhofstrasse 6 (Fernrohrbildsucher. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 25 September 1952, granted 20 November 1952. German Patent DE1646813 (U)).
    Address 1958: Südliche Römerstrasse 18-26, Altenstadt (see [Polyplast and Neoplast Catalog] Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Schongau. (n.d.) (~ 1958) 6pp.).
    Address 1960: Römerstrasse 104 (see Irisblende. Vorzugsweise für Objektive von automatischen Kameras mit Belichtings- oder Druckblendensteuerung. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 27 February 1960, granted 19 May 1960. German Patent DE1811662 (U)).
  12. See Handelregister HRB 46245.—For 1952 date see Fernrohrbildsucher. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 25 September 1952, granted 20 November 1952. German Patent DE1646813 (U).—See also German trademark issued on 24 Dec 1958: Wort-Bildmarke von Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co (DE732266). extended (by Agfa 24 December 1988, cancelled 17 October 2000.
  13. Der Druckspiegel, vol 24 (1969), Issue 9-12, p. 62.—On 13 June 1988 Agfa applied for the trademark STAEBLE Wortmarke von Agfa-Gevaert AG (DE1126417); trademark extinguished 1 July 2008.
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 14.11 14.12 14.13 14.14 14.15 Photographische Apparate. Kaufhaus des Westens. Illustrierter Hauptkatalog 1913, p. 135. The 'Kaufhaus des Westens' was a Berlin-based department store and mail-order house.
  15. Auktion Team Köln 2006 Lot 922.—Larger pictures Auktion Team Köln.
  16. Norway Photomuseum
  17. Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann made in 1927
  18. Thiele, Hartmut (2008) Staeble-Optik. Die Geschichte des Optischen Werkes, Aufstellung der gesamten Objektivfertigung von 1917 bis 1972. München: Lindemanns Fotobuchhandlung.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 19.6 Wilkinson, M. and Glanfield, C. A lens collector's vade mecum. Version 07/05/2001. Distributed as a CD or PDF file
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 20.6 20.7 20.8 20.9 Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble & Co. G.M.b.H Muenchen. 1912 Catalogue extracts at www.cameraeccentric.com
  21. 21.00 21.01 21.02 21.03 21.04 21.05 21.06 21.07 21.08 21.09 21.10 21.11 21.12 21.13 21.14 21.15 21.16 21.17 21.18 21.19 21.20 21.21 21.22 21.23 21.24 21.25 21.26 21.27 21.28 21.29 21.30 21.31 21.32 Seen in an eBay auction December 2012,
  22. Christies Lot 409 / Sale 4881.
  23. Breker September 2006 Lot 948
  24. Unknown Vest Pocket Strut Camera at Antique & Vintage Photographic Equipment.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 Perlux in Classic Cameras.
  26. Staeble, Franz (1928) Anachromat Kühn«, Photographische Rundschau und Mitteilungen vol. 65, pp. 189-190.—A History of the Imagon lens by Dr. Alfons Schultz.— Young, William Russell (2008) The soft-focus lens and Anglo-American pictorialism. Thesis. University of St Andrews.
  27. Westlicht 21/Lot 561
  28. Some commentators were very critical: "Occasionally, for some reason, a designer will try the effect of combining two dissimilar cemented components about a central stop. It is hard to see the virtue of such an arrangement,except perhaps as an economy measure." (Kingslake, Rudolf [1989] A history of the photographic lens. London: Academic Press, p. 102)
  29. via flickr
  30. Diaprojektor "Paximat" in Industrie- und Filmmuseum Wolfen
  31. Offered on eBay as a newspaper clipping without actual source given.
  32. For patent see: Zielfernrohr für Luftgewehre. Inventor and Applicant Optisches Werk Dr. Staeble, Friedl & Co. KG. Filed 27 June 1963, granted 4 November 1965. German Patent DE1204424 (B).
  33. Various on-line auctions for guns
  34. Offered on eBay as a newspaper clipping without actual source given.
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