Difference between revisions of "Balda Juwella"

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|image_text= Juwella, 1936 or 1938 model
 
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|image_text= Alternate shutter faceplate, also 1936 or 1938.
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The '''Juwella''' is a folding camera made by [[Balda]] in the 1930s. It makes 6&times;9 cm images (and some cameras can also be masked for 4.5x6 cm pictures; this was an optional feature) on [[120]] roll film. McKeown lists four generations of the camera, dated to 1933, 1936, 1938 and 1939.<ref name=McK>{{McKeown12}} p104-5.</ref> The first of these was at first named the '''''Jubella''''' for a short period, to celebrate Balda's 25th year (as the [[Jubilette]] was named for the company's 30th year in 1938); Jubellas are identified by the name impressed in the leatherette, and the lens has the same name.<ref name=McK></ref>
  
The Juwella is a folding camera made by [[Balda]] in the 1930s. It is a [[folder]] exposing 6&times;9 cm images on [[120]] roll film.  
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The camera is self-erecting, with a button to release the front next to the film winding knob or key.
  
==Description==
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The lens is a fixed 10.5 cm f/6.3 or f/4.5 Juwella [[Anastigmat]] (or Jubella in the earliest cameras), with front-element focusing to about two metres. Many examples have an [[everset shutter]] with speeds 1/25 - 1/100 second, plus 'B' and 'T'; this may be Balda's own, or a [[Pronto]], with the same speeds but also with a [[self-timer]]. McKeown states that better-specified shutters including Compur and Prontor II were available on at least the 1938 camera. A body-mounted shutter release button was an optional feature of the 1939 model,<ref name=McK></ref>; however, some cameras from 1936 onwards have a curious clasp mounted on the front, just above the front door, which holds the end of a cable release (thus providing a body-mounted shutter release).
The fixed lens is an [[anastigmat]] 10.5 cm (105 mm) marketed as Juwella. It has a maximum aperture of ''f''6.3 of ''f''4.5. It has shutter speeds 1/100", 1/50", 1/25", and the settings '''''T''''' and '''''B'''''. The main framing device is a double window to adjust for [[parallax error]]. The Juwella also has a viewfinder mounted to the lens and shutter mechanism. The body of the camera is a monkey box of sorts. It has no hot shoe for a flash but has a spring-loaded keyhole for the insertion and lock of accessory objects (which are presumably no longer made...). The tripod-mount of the Juwella is of the type (5/8") used for larger cameras. Some Juwellas have slightly different setups (such as film masks,  shutters etc...) and variations were produced for different manufacturers [http://www.flickr.com/photos/alf_sigaro/2275676702/ 1].
 
  
== Opening the Camera ==
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In most examples, the main viewfinder is a double frame type, with extra frames for the half-frame format on those cameras adapted for it. McKeown states that a [[Viewfinder#Telescopic finders|reverse-Galilean finder]] was an option from 1938.<ref name=McK></ref> There is also a [[Brilliant finder]] mounted on the lens standard, which swivels for horizontal and vertical use. <!--The body of the camera is a monkey box of sorts.  ? If anyone understands what that sentence means, feel free to reinstate it (and explain to me!) -->
  
The opening and closing of the film compartment is quite confusing for the first time user... There is a very small latch on the side of the keyhole and strap. There is an even smaller arrow indicating the direction to pull it. The back of the camera will now be unlocked. The place for the insertion of fresh 120 film readily folds out for quick insertion. The place for the take-up spool does not do the same. The trick is to pull up on the wind-up key; similar to modern 35mm cameras.
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The earliest Juwellas have a film winding knob, which is replaced with a winding key in later models. the film compartment opens with a small sliding latch (marked with an arrow) by the carrying strap. In the back, there is a swing-out holder for the full spool; at the other end, the winding key must be pulled out to fit the take-up spool.
  
== Revealing the Bellows ==
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The camera has a ⅝-inch tripod bush.
  
To open the bellows of Juwella, you must first find a small button to the front-left of the two-frame viewfinder. After you push it, the door of the bellows will be released and can be opened until it snaps into place with the help of the folding door lever.
 
  
  
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==Notes==
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|image_text= Alternate Juwella faceplate design
 
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[[Category: 120 film]]
 
[[Category: 120 film]]
 
[[Category: German 6x9 viewfinder folding]]
 
[[Category: German 6x9 viewfinder folding]]
[[Category: 1938]]
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[[Category: 1933]]
[[Category: B]]
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[[Category: J|Juwella]]

Latest revision as of 18:21, 13 March 2012

The Juwella is a folding camera made by Balda in the 1930s. It makes 6×9 cm images (and some cameras can also be masked for 4.5x6 cm pictures; this was an optional feature) on 120 roll film. McKeown lists four generations of the camera, dated to 1933, 1936, 1938 and 1939.[1] The first of these was at first named the Jubella for a short period, to celebrate Balda's 25th year (as the Jubilette was named for the company's 30th year in 1938); Jubellas are identified by the name impressed in the leatherette, and the lens has the same name.[1]

The camera is self-erecting, with a button to release the front next to the film winding knob or key.

The lens is a fixed 10.5 cm f/6.3 or f/4.5 Juwella Anastigmat (or Jubella in the earliest cameras), with front-element focusing to about two metres. Many examples have an everset shutter with speeds 1/25 - 1/100 second, plus 'B' and 'T'; this may be Balda's own, or a Pronto, with the same speeds but also with a self-timer. McKeown states that better-specified shutters including Compur and Prontor II were available on at least the 1938 camera. A body-mounted shutter release button was an optional feature of the 1939 model,[1]; however, some cameras from 1936 onwards have a curious clasp mounted on the front, just above the front door, which holds the end of a cable release (thus providing a body-mounted shutter release).

In most examples, the main viewfinder is a double frame type, with extra frames for the half-frame format on those cameras adapted for it. McKeown states that a reverse-Galilean finder was an option from 1938.[1] There is also a Brilliant finder mounted on the lens standard, which swivels for horizontal and vertical use.

The earliest Juwellas have a film winding knob, which is replaced with a winding key in later models. the film compartment opens with a small sliding latch (marked with an arrow) by the carrying strap. In the back, there is a swing-out holder for the full spool; at the other end, the winding key must be pulled out to fit the take-up spool.

The camera has a ⅝-inch tripod bush.



Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 McKeown, James M. and Joan C. McKeown's Price Guide to Antique and Classic Cameras, 12th Edition, 2005-2006. USA, Centennial Photo Service, 2004. ISBN 0-931838-40-1 (hardcover). ISBN 0-931838-41-X (softcover). p104-5.