User:Heritagefutures/WorkSpace5

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French Lens Sizes

At the end of the XIXth and early XXth century, French manufacturers like Derogy or Hermagis often coded their standard lenses (Aplanats, Aplanastigmats, Portrait lenses) with standard type numbers. The larger the number, the shorter the focal length… half steps were coded by appending 'bis' (for ½).

Focal length  
Nº  Hermagis Hermagis Darlot    Berthiot
  Portrait Aplanastigmat[1]
Nº 1
Nº 2
Nº 3 540mm
Nº 4
Nº 5 360mm
Nº 5 bis 310mm
Nº 6 270mm
Nº 6 bis   230mm
Nº 7 210mm
Nº 7 bis 170mm
Nº 8 140mm
Nº 9 110mm


Notes

  1. 'Nouveau Aplanastigmats Extra Rapides. L'amateur d' excursions photographiques. edited by J. Fleury-Hermagis. Paris: Hermagis 18 Rue de Rambuteau. nº1, October 1895, p. 112.


This is a work in progress.

Pathé

French   (edit)
companies
 
AFR | Alsaphot | André and Lieutier | Angénieux | Arca Swiss | As de Trèfle | Atoms | Aubertin | Balcar | Bardin | Bauchet | Baudry | Bellieni | Berthiot | Boumsell | Boyer | Bronzavia | Cindo | Cord | Cornu | Coronet | Darlot | Demaria-Lapierre | Derogy | Faller | FAP | Fex | Compagnie Française de Photographie | Gallus | Gaumont | Georges Paris | Girard | Gitzo | Goldstein | Héard & Mallinjod | Hermagis | Idam | Itier | Jousset | Joux | Kafta | Kinax | Kodak Pathé | Krauss | Lumière | Lund | Mackenstein | Manufrance | MAPED | Mazo | MFAP | MIOM | Mollier | Mundus | Olbia | Omega | OPL | Pierrat | Richard | Richard (Jules) | Roussel | Royer | SEM | Secam | SIAP | Soulé | Spirotechnique | Tiranty | Vergne | Zion (France)

Pathé Freres was a


Pathé Freres Extra Lumineux cinematic projection lens ( Petzval design)[1]

Pathé Renforcé projector a 35mm projector with brass fitting: http://www.flickr.com/photos/72185241@N00/3259704183/
Pathé N.A.U. from around 1920 http://www.flickr.com/photos/72185241@N00/5582066703



References

  1. The lenses lack serial numbers as well as any means of identification of the manufacturer. See here for the total strip down of two Extra Lumineux 150mm lenses: lens 1, lens 2.
  2. Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann
  3. Seen in an on-line auction (October 2013).
  4. Seen in an on-line auction (June 2013).
This is a work in progress.


French Distributors

Put in auto redirects from each company  page to here and explain that that allows for future expansion unless full page developed

During the late XIXth and early XXth century there were a number of specialised photographic shops in Paris, all of which maintained a mail order business as well. Their individual buying power was such that many OEM supplied custom badged units. A common practice, especially from the end of World War I to the late 1930s, was to order German-built camera bodies, which would be fitted with German or French shutters and French optics.

Photo-Hall

Photo–Hall distributed its re-branded cameras under the following brand names:



-Photo-Omnia

76 avenue des Termes, Paris 17ème

Photo-Omnia distributed its re-branded cameras under the following brand names:


Photo-Opera

Photo–Opera distributed its re-branded cameras under the following brand names:


Photo-Plait

Founded in ¶¶ Photo-Plait was arguably the largest and most influential of the French distributors.

in 1918 at 37-39 Rue Lafayette, Paris 1ème

Photo–Plait distributed its re-branded cameras under the following names: Studiolette

Some of the lenses of Photo-Plait branded cameras carried the following brand names: Anastigmat P.P. Paris, Anastigmat Splendor

Photo-Sport

Photo–Sport distributed its re-branded cameras under the following brand names:


Links

add links to the Sylvain Halgand Catalogues

References


This is a work in progress.


Photo-Plait

in 1918 at 37-39 Rue Lafayette, Paris 1ème

example of the Foth mixted with tag

Cameras distributed under own name

Photo–Plait distributed its re-branded cameras under the following brand names:

  • Studiolette[1]

Lens Names

Some of the lenses carried the following brand names:

  • Anastigmat P.P. Paris[2]
  • Anastigmat Splendor





References

  1. Photo–Plait Studiolette (Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann)
  2. Anastigmat1:6.3 120mm P.P. Paris 15521 (Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann)


This is a work in progress.

Perfect Détective

Before posting
1) rename Japanese shutter page,  make disambiguation page for Perfect 
2) ensure that all links to the Japanese page are updated
3) create auto redirect Perfect Detective  to Perfect Détective

The 'Perfect' Détective was a range of box cameras with a falling-plate magazine sold by the Paris-based distributor Photo-Hall between 1899 and 1914.[1]

After the success of selling the Murer & Duroni Express Détective since April 1886,[2] Photo-Hall decided to offer its own version to capitalise on the market in cameras with a falling plate magazines. The 'Perfect' Détective Nº 1 was first offered in April 1899 when it was described as special model for Photo-Hall with a trademarked name.[3] It came in two versions for 12 plates of 6 ½ x 9 and 9x12 format. At the same time, Photo-Hall also Introduced two better-quality models, the 'Perfect' Détective Nº 2 and Nº 3.

Photo-Hall rebadged and later custom-badged units acquired from OEM companies, mainly German suppliers such as Ernemann ?

Model Variations

Based on an examination of the Photo-Hall trade catalogues 1899 to 1914[4] the following model variations can be observed over time:


http://www.collection-appareils.fr/photo-hall/html/perfect_detective.php#FT

http://patra.vefblog.net/44.html

'Perfect' Detective Nº 1 (1899–1914)

1899

1900

1901/02

My camera is a Photo-Hall 'Perfect' Detective Nº 1

The specific model can be found in the Photo-Hall catalogues for April 1901 (p.9) and April 1902 (p. 4). It is a different model the year prior (Catalogue Photo-Hall April 1900 p.2) and the year after (Catalogue Photo-Hall April 1903 p.7). check that 1903 is really different

1903

1910

with Steinheil f/4 http://www.appaphot.be/fr-be/brands/p/photo%20hall/perfect_detective.aspx


'Perfect' Detective Nº 1bis (1902–1906)

1902

'Perfect' Detective Nº 2 (1899–1914)

1899

Photo-Hall 'Perfect' Detective Nº 2 http://www.collection-appareils.fr/x/html/affich_FT.php?id_appareil=2702

'Perfect' Detective Nº 3 (1899–1914)

1899

'Perfect' Detective Nº 4 (1900)

References

  1. Photo-Hall Catalogue April 1899 p. 3; ADD 1914REF¶¶
  2. Photo-Hall Catalogue April 1896 p. 2.
  3. "Modèle special du Photo-Hall, marque depose." Photo-Hall Catalogue April 1899 p. 3.
  4. Accessible via www.collection-appareils.fr Sylvain Halgand's site.


This is a work in progress.


Colmont

French   (edit)
companies
 
AFR | Alsaphot | André and Lieutier | Angénieux | Arca Swiss | As de Trèfle | Atoms | Aubertin | Balcar | Bardin | Bauchet | Baudry | Bellieni | Berthiot | Boumsell | Boyer | Bronzavia | Cindo | Cord | Cornu | Coronet | Darlot | Demaria-Lapierre | Derogy | Faller | FAP | Fex | Compagnie Française de Photographie | Gallus | Gaumont | Georges Paris | Girard | Gitzo | Goldstein | Héard & Mallinjod | Hermagis | Idam | Itier | Jousset | Joux | Kafta | Kinax | Kodak Pathé | Krauss | Lumière | Lund | Mackenstein | Manufrance | MAPED | Mazo | MFAP | MIOM | Mollier | Mundus | Olbia | Omega | OPL | Pierrat | Richard | Richard (Jules) | Roussel | Royer | SEM | Secam | SIAP | Soulé | Spirotechnique | Tiranty | Vergne | Zion (France)

M.Colmont was a French optics manufacturer based in Paris (~1890s–1950s). In 1894 the company is on record for 37–39, avenue de la République;[1] and by 1925 the Etablissements P.E. Valette are documented as manufacturing Colmont products at the same address.[2]

While primarily manufacturing binoculars for the theatre, field and military markets,[3] Colmont made a limited range of lenses for photographic applications during the late XIXth and early XXth century.[4] The lenses are signed Colmont F[abrican]t Paris.

* FIND : Annuaire des fabricants à Paris en 1886	


Cameras

  • Colmont Discope (1922– >1925) stereo camera 6x13[5]

Lenses


References

  1. M. Colmont, fabricant de jumelles, 37 et. 39, avenue de la République, Paris XIe.—1894: Tombé d'un cinquième étage. Le Stéphanois 22 February 1894, p. 2 col. 2 pdf page image.
  2. P.E. Valette, 39, Avenue de la République, Paris XIe (advert in Photo Ciné Revue April 1925).
  3. See here for examples: Collecting military binoculars, French binoculars.—The binoculars were exported globally, e.g. advertisements in Australian papers: The Sydney Morning Herald 20 September 1911, p. 24; Evening News (Sydney) 3 April 1925, p. 8; The Mercury (Hobart) 3 May 1949, p. 13.—During World War I Colmont also manufactured military optics for the French Army, esp. gun laying optics (various on-line auction listings).
  4. Mentioned in M. Wilkinson and C. Glanfield (2001), A lens collector's vademecum.
  5. Manufactured by Etablissements P.E. Valette, 39, Avenue de la République, Paris XIe (advert in Photo Ciné Revue April 1925).—The lenses in the units are not specifically marked.—Serial numbers: 17 Stereocollection (French site); 193 cgancedo65 via Flickr; 240 this discussion thread on Sylvain Halgand's site; 254 Sylvain Halgand's site; 394 Jensens Fototeknise Samling;
  6. Mentioned in M. Wilkinson and C. Glanfield (2001), A lens collector's vade mecum.
  7. Photographica Collection Dirk HR Spennemann
This is a work in progress.



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