Difference between revisions of "Jupiter-9"

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The rangefinder version of the Jupiter-9 focuses to 1.15 metre; the Zenit versions focus to 0.8 metre.<ref name=KMZArc/>
 
The rangefinder version of the Jupiter-9 focuses to 1.15 metre; the Zenit versions focus to 0.8 metre.<ref name=KMZArc/>
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Latest revision as of 06:03, 6 February 2019

The Jupiter 9 is an 85 mm f/2 lens made in the Soviet Union. It is based on the design of the Sonnar, the technical information having been taken from Carl Zeiss in reparations at the end of the Second World War. Production began in 1948, when the lens was initially called the LC-85.[1] It appears, for both Zorki and Kiev mount, in a 1949 catalogue.[2]

The lens has seven glass elements in three groups; a single glass at the front, and two cemented groups of three. All versions of the lens are coated.

It was originally made by the LZOS factory, in a Leica 39 mm thread mount for Fed and Zorki rangefinders, and later adapted for both early M39 and later M42-mount Zenit SLR cameras. Jupiter-9 lenses were also made at the Arsenal factor in Ukraine, both for Kiev rangefinders, in the Kiev/Contax bayonet, and later for the Kiev Automat SLRs (such as the Kiev 10), in their own bayonet fitting.[3] This version of the lens has no aperture ring; the aperture is set with a control on the camera, next to the lens mount, as part of the auto-exposure system.[4] There is also a version for the Narciss subminiature SLR camera for 16 mm film, with an M24×1 thread mount.[1]

Early versions of the lens are in polished aluminium bodies, as pictured here. Later lenses are black.

The rangefinder version of the Jupiter-9 focuses to 1.15 metre; the Zenit versions focus to 0.8 metre.[1]


Optical formula from OPAL database

 Cистема-Юпитер-9   f'=83   2w=25  1:2

 Nsurf  radii          thick      heig      glass      reflaction indices 
                                                 L=   .546070   .435830   .656280
                                             air
   1      46.450        5.600      25.230      ТК16  1.615193  1.625734  1.609501
   2     268.500         .400      20.500    air
   3      25.940        5.800      20.400      БФ13  1.642767  1.656355  1.635656
   4      52.000        7.500      17.550        К1  1.500095  1.507625  1.495907
   5    -264.200        1.800      15.250       ТФ2  1.677619  1.699829  1.666600
   6      16.444       13.800       7.200    air
   7   -1043.650        2.800       7.200       ОФ1  1.531924  1.542250  1.526400
   8      44.510       10.600       6.900      БФ13  1.642767  1.656355  1.635656
   9     -15.031        2.900       7.400       БФ7  1.582158  1.593071  1.576359
  10     -95.060                    8.950    air

 aperture is 6mm after 6th surface, d=12.5

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jupiter 9 page (in Russian) previously at the KMZ Archive website (http://www.zenitcamera.com)] in December 2008.
  2. 1949 Soviet lens catalogue, also previously shown at the KMZ Archive.
  3. Soviet 35 mm SLR lenses at Nathan Dayton's Communist Cameras site.
  4. Kiev SLR cameras at Communist Cameras.

Links